Statues, Monuments & Memorials

VisitGalway - Liam Mellows Monument

Liam Mellows Statue

This statue is dedicated to Liam Mellows, a member of the IRB and the Irish Volunteers. Mellows was an influential figure in Irish history. During the 1916 Easter Rising, he lead the Irish Volunteers in a number of local attacks. He was Director of Supplies during the War of Independence and was elected as a Sinn Fein TD to the First Dáil (1918). Mellows was executed on the 8 December 1922 after he was arrested and imprisoned following the capture of the Anti-Treaty Four Courts garrison.

The Browne Doorway - VisitGalway

The Browne Doorway

The Browne Doorway was the former entrance to the Browne house of 1627. It was removed from original location in 1905 to form a freestanding feature in Eyre Square. The monument doorway is a reminder of the great architecture in the days of Galway’s civic opulence between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. The Renaissance doorway displays fine carved detailing to include the coats of arms of the two families united by marriage which is a typical feature found in medieval and late medieval contexts.

VisitGalway - Fr. Tom Burke Monument

Fr. Tom Burke Monument

This statue represents Fr. Tom Burke who was a Dominican preacher. Fr. Burke was known as the ‘Prince of the Preachers’ for his work done in the USA at the end of the nineteenth century. The sculpture, by Seán Kavanagh, is testament to the work done by Fr. Burke, along with being a physical reminder of the area’s social and religious history.

VisitGalway - D'Arcy Monument

D’Arcy Monument

This monument commemorates John D’Arcy (1785-1839), the founder of Clifden. Various examples of graffiti dating from 1871 can be found etched into monument. In addition, the location of the monument, on the peak of a hill provides breathtaking views for visitors and locals to observe Clifden town.

VisitGalway - Tomás Ó Faoláin Monument

Tomás Ó Faoláin Monument

This monument commemorates Tomás Ó Faoláin, who died in the War of Independence. The monument is an important historical reminder of the country’s troubled past.

VisitGalway - Le Poer Trench Memorial

Le Poer Trench Memorial

This monument was erected in honour of Charles Le Poer Trench who was Archdeacon of Ardagh and a member of the Trench family of Garbally. The monument was finely designed and executed by George Papworth and is dramatically sited to make it an eye-catcher for visitors and locals to Ballinasloe town.

VisitGalway - Edmund Hopkins Monument

Edmund Hopkins Monument

This monument commemorates Edmund Hopkins and is dated from 1686. The monument is unusual in that it stands on its own and has no other old building or graveyard near it. Local folk stories has it that Edmund Hopkins died at this spot in 1686 after falling from his horse while out hunting. The Hopkins family were evicted from Leinster as part of the Cromwellian transplantations. It is believed that this is the only known monument to have a direct link to the phrase “To Hell or to Connaught”.

VisitGalway - Parnell Monument

Parnell Monument

This monument commemorates Charles Stewart Parnell and was presumably erected after his death as a strong political statement in support of the great patriot and his cause. Monuments to Parnell are rare and would have been politically contentious when erected. On the monument there is a portrait framed with the words ‘Ireland a Nation’ and ‘Let my love be conveyed to my colleagues and to the Irish people’.

VisitGalway - James Lally Memorial

James Lally Memorial

This monument is inscribed to commemorate James Lally and his family. The monument is unusual, like others in the county, in that it stands in the middle of a field. It is part of a series of late seventeenth-century memorials to local families in North Galway and also bears comparison with the later cenotaphs on Oileáin Árann/ Aran Islands.

VisitGalway - Kelly's Monument

Kelly’s Monument

This freestanding five-stage round tower, dated 1877, is an interesting example of the Gaelic Revival, thirty years before the flowering of the Hiberno-Romanesque style. The monument honours Denis Henry Kelly who was a landowner of 13,500 acres of the surrounding countryside of Ballygar. It was Denis who established a toll market to his Ballygar town, which thrived and brought much business to the town.

VisitGalway - Moyne House Monument

Moyne House Monument

This is an unusual, yet simple freestanding monument set on an elevated position on possibly a manmade hill. It is believed the monument is associated with Moyne House which was built in the first half of the eighteenth century by Michael J. Browne.

VisitGalway - Laghta Oliver Brown Monument

Abbeyknockmoy Monument

This is an unusual freestanding monument set in a field adding to the architectural roadscape outside Abbeyknockmoy. It is not known who the monument is dedicated to, but it is believed that it was built around 1720’s and perhaps honours that of a wealthy landowner at the time.

VisitGalway - Oliver Brown Monument

Oliver Brown Monument

This monument it otherwise known as a ‘laght’, from the Irish word leacht, and is traditionally used to refer to a pile of stones over a grave. The monument is believed to have been erected following the death of a local man, Oliver Brown, after he was thrown from his horse at this spot.

VisitGalway - Memorial Cross

Memorial Cross

This cross, which stands prominently in the village of Castlegar, memorialises several local men who died during the War of Independence and the Civil War. The limestone monument employs the motifs of the celtic cross and insular interlace or strapwork. These were celtic motifs typical of such monuments of the mid-twentieth century.

VisitGalway - Menlough Monument

Menlo Monument

This is an interesting monument also known as a ‘laght’ or leacht, traditionally used to refer to a pile of stones over a grave, for use as a memorial. It was typical of a small group in the county from this era to do this. Unfortunately it is unknown as to who the memorial was dedicated.

VisitGalway - Patrick Hogan Monument

Patrick Hogan Monument

This freestanding limestone Celtic cross memorial, erected in 1938, marks the spot where Patrick Hogan TD was killed in a car accident in 1936. He served as Minister for Land and Agriculture in W.T. Cosgrave’s cabinet from 1922 to 1932.

VisitGalway - Fr. Griffin Monument

Fr. Griffin Monument

This religious and republican monument was erected to commemorate Fr Michael Griffin, a local priest who ‘would not break the seal of confession’. The monument acts as a poignant reminder of Ireland’s troubled past. Its style and design is similar to other nationalist monuments dispersed throughout the Irish countryside.

VisitGalway - Joseph Howley Monument

Joseph Howley Monument

This monument commemorates Commdt. Joseph Howley, who led a contingent of men from the area in an attempt to capture Oranmore Barracks in 1916. He was later shot dead by British forces in the War of Independence. The well finished statue, carved in the round, depicts Howley reaching for his gun.

VisitGalway - Sorry No Image Available

John Lynch Memorial

This monument is a memorial, also known as a Leacht Cuimhne. The monument is in memory of John Lynch and is set inside the gateway to Lavally House, his former residence.

VisitGalway - Patrick Folan Memorial

Patrick Folan Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of a local named Patrick Folan who died 1819.

VisitGalway - John Dirrane Memorial

John Dirrane Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of a local named John Dirrane who died 1855.

VisitGalway - Patrick Dirrane Memorial

Patrick Dirrane Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of a local named Patrick Dirrane who died 1820.

VisitGalway - Ann Dirrane Memorial

Ann Dirrane Memorial 

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of a local named Ann Dirrane who died 1846.

VisitGalway - Patrick O'Donnell Memorial

Patrick O’Donnell Memorial 

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of locals named Patrick O’Donnell who died 1863 and wife (unnamed) died 1842.

VisitGalway - Rodger Connelly Memorial

Rodger Connelly Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of locals Rodger Connelly who died 1853 and wife Anne died 1872. In addition there is a plaque to west face dedicated to Anne’s son Michael who died 1859.

VisitGalway - Bridget Derrane

Bridget Derrane Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of locals Bridget Derrane who died 1811 and her daughter Julia Derrane who died 1868.

VisitGalway - Thomas Mullin Memorial

Thomas Mullin Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of local Thomas Mullin who died 1876.

VisitGalway - Fr. Michael O'Donoghue Memorial

Fr. Michael O’Donoghue Memorial

This cross was sculpted by Pearse of Dublin, the family of the 1916 patriot, Patrick Pearse, in memory of Fr Michael O’Donoghue, parish priest of Árainn. Its prominent siting in Cill Rónáin, near the harbour, makes it among the first thing seen by visitors to Árainn.

VisitGalway - Hugh Gill Memorial

Hugh Gill Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of locals Hugh Gill who died 1840 and Peter Gill who died 1892.

VisitGalway - Catherine Gill Memorial

Catherine Gill Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of local Catherine Gill née Flaherty who died 1846.

VisitGalway - Denis O'Donnell Memorial

Denis O’Donnell Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of locals Denis O’Donnell who died 1834 and his wife Ann and their children.

VisitGalway - Simon Wiggins Memorial

Simon Wiggins Memorial 

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of local Simon Wiggins who died 1845.

VisitGalway - Martin O'Flaherty Memorial

Martin O’Flaherty Memorial 

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of local Martin O’Flaherty who died 1848.

VisitGalway - Margaret O'Flaherty Memorial

Margaret O’Flaherty Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of local Margaret O’Flaherty née Dirrane who died 1830.

VisitGalway - James Naughten Memorial

James Naughten Memorial 

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of local James Naughten who died 1817.

VisitGalway - Michael McDonogh Memorial

Michael McDonogh Memorial 

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of local Michael McDonogh who died 1820.

VisitGalway - Captain Anthony O'Flaherty Memorial

Captain Anthony O’Flaherty Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of Captain Anthony O’Flaherty who died 1822.

VisitGalway - Edmund Dirrane Memorial

Edmund Dirrane Memorial 

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of Edmund Dirrane who died 1827.

VisitGalway - John Wiggins Memorial

John Wiggins Memorial 

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of John Wiggins who died 1837.

VisitGalway - Michael Dirrane Memorial

Michael Dirrane Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of Michael Dirrane and his wife Catherine Dirrane née Coneely who both died 1817.

VisitGalway - Peter Wiggins Memorial

Peter Wiggins Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of Peter Wiggins who died 1826.

VisitGalway - Patrick Flaherty Memorial

Patrick Flaherty Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of Patrick Flaherty who died 1830.

VisitGalway - Fitzpatrick Family Memorial

Fitzpatrick Family Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of Denis Fitzpatrick who died 1753, Peter Fitzpatrick who died 1754 and John Fitzpatrick who died 1754.

VisitGalway - Fitzpatrick Family Memorial

Fitzpatrick Family Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of Richard Fitzpatrick who died 1701, John Fitzpatrick and his wife Sara M. Sweiny who both died 1709 and Florence Fitzpatrick who died 1709.

VisitGalway - Sara M. Sweiny Memorial

Sara M. Sweiny Memorial

This cenotaph is one of a remarkable series of distinctive memorials on Árainn, erected to the memory of Sara M. Sweiny who died 1709.

VisitGalway - Monsignor Timothy Joyce Memorial

Monsignor Timothy Joyce Memorial

This memorial is a cast bronze statue based on the popular depiction of the Pieta, the body of Christ held by his mother. A plaque on the southeast reads ‘Beegans of Ballinasloe’, on the southwest reads ‘Presented by Theresa Grace (née) Joyce U.S.A’ while that on the south reads ‘Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on the south of Rgt. Rev. Mgr. T. J. Joyce P.P.V.G. Portumna who died 20th February 1947 RIP’.

VisitGalway - Kennedy Memorial

Kennedy Memorial

In 1963, just five months before his assassination, US President John F. Kennedy visited Ireland and stopped briefly in Galway on the 29th of June before leaving the country.  In 1965, the park in Eyre Square was renamed the John F. Kennedy Memorial Park.  Soon after, a monument with a central bronze profile cast from a wood carving by local sculptor Albert O’Toole but was subsequently replaced in the early 2000s by the new monument as the other had fallen.

VisitGalway - Christopher Columbus Monument

Christopher Columbus Monument 

This monument which was erected beside the Corrib river near the Spanish Arch in Galway city was presented to Galway by the city of Genoa in 1992 to commemorate both the 500th anniversary of the voyage to the New World and the visit of Columbus to Galway in 1477. In the margin of his copy of Imago Mundi, Columbus noted: Men of Cathay have come from the west. [Of this] we have seen many signs. And especially in Galway in Ireland, a man and a woman, of extraordinary appearance, have come to land on two tree trunks [or timbers? or a boat made of such?]

VisitGalway - Claddagh Memorial Sculpture

Claddagh Memorial Sculpture

This stone monument is designed with a stylized bird on the top. The monument commemorates the eight fishermen from the Claddagh fishing village who lost their lives while sailing on Galway Bay On the 4 May 1902.

VisitGalway - Oscar Wilde & Eduard Vilde Statue

Oscar Wilde & Eduard Vilde Statue

These bronze sculptures of Irish writer, Oscar Wilde (left) and Estonian writer, Eduard Vilde (right) are iconic to streets of Galway City. They appear to be conversing, but the two men are not related and never met. The Eduard Wilde statue was presented to Galway when Estonia joined the EU in 2004.

VisitGalway - Cathal Ó Fríl Monument

Cathal Ó Fríl Monument

The Cathal Ó’fríl monument, also known as, “The yellow thing”, according to students, sits outside The James Hardiman Library on the grounds of the National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG).

VisitGalway - Galway Hookers Monument

Galway Hookers Monument

Erected in 1984, with its elegant stylised metal sails, this attractive fountain is a striking feature of Galway’s Eyre Square. It was erected to celebrate a boat unique to Galway, the Galway Hooker, and is thus an important element of the social heritage as well as being of artistic interest.

VisitGalway - Ceiluradh Monument

Ceiluradh Monument

This monument was sculpted by John Coll and was presented by the UCG Graduate Society in 2004.

VisitGalway - Equality Emerging Statue

Equality Emerging Statue

The ‘Equality Emerging’ statue was sculpted by John Behan and was inspired from an idea by Eddie Higgins and Nuala Keher, founders of Equal Ireland which is a ‘not for profit’ community based, charitable trust. The statue was Unveiled in November 2001. The dedication on the statue is as follows: The statue equality emerging is dedicated to people everywhere who are struggling for equality and to those suffering because of its absence. The emerging figure represents the force for equality, the wall, those people and systems in opposition.

VisitGalway - Twin Spires Statue

Twin Spires Statue

The Twin Spires statue was commissioned by NUI Galway to mark the opening of the Arts Millennium Building in 2000. The inspiration for this sculpture, sculpted by John Behan, came from the following lines from Patrick Kavanagh’s poem “Sanctity”: “To be a poet and not know the trade. To be a lover and repel all women. Twin ironies by which great saints are made. The agonising pincer jaws of heaven”

VisitGalway - Winged Horse Statue

Winged Horse Statue 

This steel sculpture of a prancing winged horse, on a column was scultped by Conor Fallon, in honour of his father, the poet, Padraic Fallon (1905-1974) who was born in Athenry town. The sculpture was unveiled by Séamus Heaney.

VisitGalway - Árd Rí Statue

Árd Rí Statue 

This statue of metal plates depicts a high king, standing on a console in the facade of Árd Rí House.

VisitGalway - Naomh Máirtín de Porres

Naomh Máirtín de Porres Statue

The grey granite statue of St. Máirtín de Porres, depicts the saint in the act of pouring soup into a bowl for a hungry child while laying a comforting hand on the child’s head. St. Máirtín de Porres (1579-1639 – Lima)was a lay brother of the Dominican Order who was beatified in 1837 by Pope Gregory XVI and canonized in 1962 by Pope John XXIII. He is the patron saint of mixed-race people and all those seeking interracial harmony. The statue was unveiled in April 1989 at the occasion of 500 years of Dominicans in Galway.

VisitGalway - Claddagh Icon Statue

Claddagh Icon Statue

The sculpture is known as the icon of Claddagh, the former fishing village, depicting a seagull (or potentially a cormorant), a ship and the sun.

VisitGalway - Final Journey Statue

Final Journey Statue

This limestone sculpture depicts a woman lifting a veil from her head, acting as a memorial to the Magdalen women. Magdalene Laundries in Ireland, also known as Magdalene asylums, were institutions, generally run by Roman Catholics, that operated from the 18th to the late 20th centuries. They were run ostensibly to house “fallen women”. Women within these institutions were subject to hard labour and often abuse. The statue features inscribed poetry by playwright and poet Patricia Burke Brogan, who is internationally known for her award-winning play “Eclipsed” about the Magdalen Women. The memorial was unveiled on International Women’s Day 8 March 2009 and is situated backing on to the site of the former Convent of Mercy’s Magdalene laundry, which was demolished in 1991.

VisitGalway - Patsy Touhey Statue & Brothers Broderick Placques

Patsy Touhey Statue & Brothers Broderick Placques

This bronze statue shows local Patsy Toohey sitting on a limestone block. On the wall behind the statue are three plaques with portraits of Vincent and Peter Broderick, and Patsy Toohey. Patsy Toohey was a celebrated player of the uilleann pipes. The statue is sculpted by James Mac Carthy.

VisitGalway - Bobbyjo Statue

Bobbyjo Statue

This statue commemorates the racehorse ‘Bobbyjo’. Bobbyjo (1990-2001) was an Irish bred racehorse by Bustineto and Markup, best remembered as the winner of the 1999 Grand National steeplechase at Aintree. The horse broke a knee at Fairyhouse Racecourse in February 2001 and had to be put down one month later due to his incurable injuries. In addition to the status of the horse, a new steeplechase first run at Fairyhouse Racecourse in February 2003 was named after the horse.

VisitGalway - Enda Colleran Statue

Enda Colleran Statue 

This statue shows a bronze Gaelic footballer who is about to strike a ball off the ground with his right foot. The footballer is that of Enda Colleran (1942-2004) who was an Irish Gaelic football manager and player. He played football with his local club Mountbellew-Moylough and was a member of the Galway senior inter-county team from 1961 until 1971. Colleran captained Galway to back-to-back All-Ireland titles in 1965 and 1966 and later served as manager of the team. He is regarded as one of the greatest players of all-time.

VisitGalway - The Connemara Giant

The Connemara Giant Statue

The Connemara Giant statue highlights the Irish humour perfectly. The statue was created by Joyce’s Craft Shop, located across the road, “for no apparent reason”. However local legend has it that the Connemara Giant may have a bit of Irish magic about him. It is believed that if you touch the hand of the giant you will be blessed with the knowledge of his ancient tribe.

VisitGalway - Tuaha Tuama Statue

Tuaha Tuama Statue

This bronze sculpture erected in 1994 depicts modern Tuam as a Community looking outward into the world but embracing its history symbolised by Jarlath’s wheel in the centre. At the base are three motifs from the Town’s Coat of Arms – the Crown of Tuam’s 12th century High King’s, Christ’s Crown as on the High Cross of Tuam and the broken chariot wheel of St. Jarlath, founder of the town and diocese.

VisitGalway - Horse and Handler Sculpture

Horse and Handler Sculpture

This bronze sculpture of a Horse and a Handler is in reference to the Ballinasloe Horse Fair and is sculpted by sculptor James McCarthy. Ballinasloe Horse fair is one of the oldest fairs in Ireland and is also the biggest and one of the most respected horse fairs in Europe.

VisitGalway - Commemorative Sculpture

Commemorative Sculpture

This sculpture commemorates those who contributed to the cause of the Irish Independence between 1912 and 1922. The sculpture of a swan was made by Jethro Sheen and was specially commissioned by Galway County Council as part of its 1916 centenary programme.

VisitGalway - Presentation Tuam T.Y. Sculpture

Presentation Tuam T.Y. Sculpture

This sculpture was created by Donnacha Cahill with the design help from Transition Year Students in the ‘Artist in School’ class of March 2011. The sculpture depicts the modern cultral of the town of Tuam. The sculpture is of two plants (or trees), with a kind of fruit between the branches

VisitGalway - Major Richard W. Dowling Sculpture

Major Richard W. Dowling Sculpture

Richard William “Dick” Dowling was born in Knockballyvisteal, Milltown, near Tuam in 1837. He was a victorious commander at the Second Battle of Sabine Pass in the American Civil War. In 1998, the town of Tuam, placed this bronze memorial plaque of Dowling on its Town Hall facade bearing his image and explaining his feats. This is the first known memorial to an Irish-born Confederate soldier in Ireland.

VisitGalway - Pat Bracken Sculpture

Pat Bracken Sculpture

This somewhat self portrait sculpture is of Pat Bracken (1951-2010), a popular stonemason, puppeteer, sculptor, painter and actor. Bracken had been an integral part of the Galway arts scene since the early 1980s with his work with Macnas.

VisitGalway - Halifax EB134 Monument

Halifax EB134 Monument

On the night of November 7th, 1943, near the end of World War II, the locals of Lavally were awoken when a large four engine Handley Page Halifax bomber of the Royal Air Force, which had been on a night training exercise, crashed landed in a the townland of Ryehill. The aircraft was completely destroyed and its crew of seven killed. The Halifax EB134 Monument honours the men who lost their lives in the crash in a nearby field that night.

VisitGalway - Alcock & Brown Memorial and Landing Site

Alcock & Brown Memorial & Landing Site

The first successful non-stop transatlantic flight was achieved by British aviators John Alcock in June 1919. They two flew a modified First World War Vickers Vimy bomber from St. John’s, Newfoundland, to Clifden, where they crash landed in Derrygimla Bog. They were awarded the Daily Mail prize for the first crossing of the Atlantic Ocean by aeroplane in “less than 72 consecutive hours” by Winston Churchill. Furthermore, a small amount of mail was carried on the flight, making it the first transatlantic airmail flight. There are two memorials commemorating the flight sited near each other; the landing spot and a memorial sculpture of an aircraft’s tail-fin on Errislannan Hill dedicated on the fortieth anniversary of their landing, 15 June 1959.

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